kerravonsen: Neo falling, flailing his arms: "oops!" (oops)

Played with alcohol ink, ceramic tiles, and fire again tonight.

  1. Do not paint Jo Sonja Glaze Medium onto alcohol inks unless you have left them to dry for 24 hours, or not at all, unless you want your pretty pattern to be wiped off with every brushstroke. (oops)
    • So I washed off the two tiles I mentioned in my previous post, washed with water and metho(*).
    • I'm not sure what the best thing is to seal my tiles. 8-( It needs to be something that isn't going to react with the ink. I had thought a water-based medium would be okay. And maybe it is. And maybe it isn't.
  2. Less is more.
    • I messed up designs two or three times by adding more stuff when I should have stopped. The "more stuff" was either more ink (which muddied up the colours) or more alcohol squirted on it, which made some bits too light and other bits too dark, and also muddied the colours.
  3. Metho is good. I need more metho.
    • The designs I messed up, I simply poured metho on and wiped the whole tile clean.

(*) For the non-Australians in the audience, see Denatured Alcohol.

kerravonsen: Vila, worried, Avon, both looking off to the right: "We're lost, aren't we?" (lost)
Which you all appeared to be bored by. (sigh)

Yesterday and Tuesday night, crafting. More resin. Behind on photos (oh, my pretties are piling up in my photo cubicle...) (they are still pretty). Let me see, what was I doing...
* Undersea coaster (my first coaster)
* two different attempts at faux opals. I still much prefer the real thing. I want to make some faux boulder-opals, I think that would work with polymer clay, not resin.
* some tiny black things made with the leftover black resin from the faux opals
* part one of a frog-on-a-log; looking very promising
* part one of some wood in transparent-coloured resin (this was my first use of transparent colour in resin); I'm not sure if I'll leave it as is or pour another layer on it.

Also played around with alcohol ink for the first time. Splattered and dabbed some on big steel washers to make pendants. And got impatient, and did what I knew wouldn't work: attempted to do a resin dome with the Lisa Pavelka Magic-Glos... which didn't cure properly. (sigh). Did some more which I have sealed with Jo Sonja's Glaze Medium; not sure whether I will attempt doming on the sealed ones or not. Oh yes I will; the bits that did cure do look 200% nicer than leaving it flat.

And, inspired by this video, I set alcohol ink on fire. On purpose. Discovered a few things:
* one doesn't get the pretty effects on washers; I think the surface area is too small, and the shape is not suited for it; just got a ring of dark ink around the edges and lighter ink in the middle.
* 70% isopropyl alcohol doesn't catch on fire very well. Methylated spirits do, however.
* doing the splatter-and-set-on-fire thing on ceramic tiles... looks fabulous. I've done two -- I have a pile of ceramic tiles which have been set aside to do "draw on with sharpies and blend them with alcohol" decoration, but forget that, the proper alcohol ink is much better. I will do more of these.
* be very very very careful when doing this. I was perhaps not quite as careful as I should have been, but nothing caught fire that shouldn't have. I did lean back in alarm at one point, though. 8-P
* always wear gloves when working with alcohol ink. Otherwise your hands will inevitably get stained. I did wear gloves, but then I took them off, and... I did a lot of scrubbing in the bath this morning. And the stains are gone, apart from a few stubborn bits under my fingernails.

I need to do some serious decluttering. (sigh)
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)

Mostly resin, but some bits weren't. (Note that I have other pendants I completed this week lying around waiting to be photographed. Soon. I may or may not post them when I do so, depending on interest.)

(later: okay, obviously no interest (sigh))

lotsa resin )

I used up a lot of gloves, toothpicks, paper towels and tissues today. I've also been watching a bunch of youtube videos by this guy, for fun, not because I could make any of his DIYs, due to lacking the aforementioned workshop full of power tools. But this guy and this other guy even more make me wish that I had a lathe.

kerravonsen: Blair Sandburg: Take back the glee (take-back-the-glee2)
This resin stuff is getting addictive. I've done some more, both with UV resin and epoxy resin. I did some more today too, but I won't know how those turn out until tomorrow night.
So... here are some I prepared earlier.
there be pictures )
kerravonsen: Cat staring upwards: OMG iz fulla starz (full-of-stars)

This morning, knowing that it was going to be a sunny day without rain, I took the dubious UV resin pieces that I hadn't already thrown out (a rose, a starfish, and three teardrops) and put them on the back step so that they would be out in the sun ALL DAY. When I got home, I retrieved them, and they had set solid, no squishes or sticky bits. Yay! So I think that supports my theory that there wasn't enough UV in the sunlight when the sun had reached too close to the horizon. I mean, that's why we have sunsets anyway, why they're red and orange and pink.

Some more pondering on resins... )

Resinating

Nov. 16th, 2016 10:29 pm
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
I have been experimenting with multiple types of resin!

pendants-20161116-202157
Resin pendants and embellishments. Top row: all these were done with two-part epoxy resin, PearlEx mica powder, and then domed with UV resin and more mica powder. Bottom left: leaves made with layered UV resin and mica powder. Bottom centre: two-part epoxy resin and mica powder (no doming with this one). Bottom right: two-part epoxy resin, various brass beads, washers, and cogs, and golden mica powder; domed later with UV resin.

and here be the fuller story )
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
I have been busy this weekend. I made a present, and gave it. Another piece of my symbolic jewellery. The design for this one has been on the drawing-board for months, but I did no physical work on it until this weekend, starting it on Saturday and finishing it on Sunday.
Read more... )
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
This is the Grand Total of the things I have made for the upcoming "Creating a Welcome" market (all proceeds go to the Asylum Seekers Resource Centre).

One infinity scarf.
One hair scrunchie.
One dishcloth.
Nine necklace-and-earring sets.
Three necklace-and-bracelet sets.
Three standalone pairs of earrings.
Twenty-seven standalone bracelets.
Twenty-seven standalone necklaces.

Whew!

And here be pictures. Some of the pendants you've seen before, posted as WIPs, and now they are complete as necklaces!
cut for lots of images )
kerravonsen: glass button: "Shiny!" (shiny)
So, here are photos of my surviving resin experiments. I say "surviving" because most of the ones made using the Loon UV resin... broke. As in SNAP CRACK broke, with just the pressure of my fingers. No wonder it was cheaper than the other UV resins...

cut for pictures )

Yes, I definitely want to do more... when I get more resin. I only have a little left.
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
  1. UV Resin is cool.
  2. PearlEx powdered mica pigments are fabulous.
  3. Silicone moulds are the way to go.
  4. And layers, lots of layers.
  5. Never mix black pigment with your UV resin (oops). Use black nail polish instead.
  6. A little UV resin does NOT go a long way.
  7. And it's expensive.
  8. It may be that UV resin designed for fly fishing does not have the properties required for jewellery. It feels a little rubbery rather than crisply stiff. And breaks far too easily.
  9. Patience is a virtue, even with UV resin.
  10. Curing in sunlight is easier than using a UV torch. Though using a UV torch enables one to do this stuff at night. Which is important.
  11. Little eyeshadow brushes are really useful in applying mica powder.
  12. And toothpicks are good for swirling.
  13. Lumps are a sign that that bit hasn't cured. Especially if you poke the lump and it breaks up. Remove the lump and add another layer of resin to fill the hole.
  14. It is more reliable to paint on the mica powder and then pour on the next layer of resin, rather than sprinkling the mica powder and swirling it through the resin. But swirling is cool, even if it is risky.
  15. Some fine pigment powders can behave strangely if there is too much of them. Like floating on top of the resin instead of staying underneath!
  16. But at least mistakes like that can be wiped off if caught before zapping with UV.
  17. It's astonishing how many resin tutorials feature pink, unicorns, cats, and glitter.
  18. Looking at more tutorials, it seems common to pre-mix the resin with pigment, and then put it on with toothpick... so maybe my reservations about swirling are unwarranted. I guess it depends on how dense the pigment is.
  19. Pondering whether buying a UV lamp might be worth it after all. But where would I put it? Takes up too much space. But my UV torch batteries run out too fast. And clear sunny days do not come on demand. And it would have been cheaper than buying the UV torch.

Photos later.

kerravonsen: stone egg on wood: "Simplicity" (simplicity)
I couldn't resist doing more of this heat-treating stuff, so I took out some of my copper and bronze tags, and stuck them in the flames.
cut for a picture )
Now I find that the thing which takes most time is polishing them with Renaissance Wax afterwards. I tried to speed it up by using my Dremel, but it didn't seem to do as good a job as doing it by hand. 8-( My index fingers are sore.
kerravonsen: glass button: "Shiny!" (shiny)
So yesterday I was looking at How to EASILY Anodize Titanium at Home (2 Methods) and wondering if I should invest in a dozen or so 9-volt batteries and where I might purchase some insulated alligator-clip wires...
This morning it occurred to me that I could test out Method 2 -- the heat method -- without needing any extra equipment; just a gas stove and some fine metal tongs, which I had. And a pyrex dish filled with ice water. And some already-anodized Titanium scales, which I had thought I had ruined by over-tumbling them.

So....

I did some playing with fire.

cut for images )

Ta-da! I got the multi-colour effect by sticking just the tip of the scale in the flames; that caused the oxidation to be graduated from the tip to the base. Cool, eh?



Then I wondered, in the interests of science, what would happen if I did the same thing with copper scales. I made the mistake with the first one to put it into the ice water, and it went completely black with firescale. Then the second one, I put on my breadboard, which now has a leaf-shaped outline burnt into it. So I got my smallest tempered glass board and put the scales on that instead. Two more dud scales, but the rest were... astonishing. Nothing that I had expected. So cool!
cut for another image )
The trick with the ones with the v-shaped pattern and the dark base, was not to leave it poking into the flames too long, only to allow the tip to heat to a dull red. If one left it a teeny little longer, the colour-change went over all the scale like an oil slick, which was really cool, but if one left it a moment beyond that, it went a uniform pale pinkish-orange colour all over, not very interesting. Very tricky timing.

I polished them with Renaissance Wax, I hope that will preserve the colours.

Edited to Add:
Read more... )
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
I wanted to make a necklace for myself, just a simple-but-elegant thing that was quite short, good for wearing with open-necked clothes. It's been on hiatus for a while, but today I finished it!

necklace_blackice_2016-04-24
Black Ice Necklace by Kathryn Andersen. Maille, oval brass rings (Black Ice) Weave: 6-in-1 Spiral
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
Y'all know I like craft. So I get these project ideas, and I buy stuff for them. But I haven't been so great at putting my purchases away, of late. It is only in the last week or two that I have finally finished sorting out and putting away maille rings which I purchased (goes and looks) more than a year ago. I've been pecking away at the chaos bit by bit.

Today I started looking through the pile of stuff that I'd put on the bed in the spare room when I cleared the desk in my study when I was setting up my laptop as a server back in January. Really miscellaneous stuff, including bags with craft-supply purchases from Lincraft and from el-cheapo places like the Reject Shop and random "$2" stores. Now, some of them would have been "oh, this could be useful in the future, I'll get it now", but some of them I am sure I bought with specific projects in mind, but now, for the life of me, I cannot remember what those projects were.

What did I want to do with these things?

* A bag of random scraps of leather.
* Four 15cm metal zips - I have a vague idea that it was important that they were metal zips and not plastic, but I still can't remember why.
* Black ribbed elastic.
* Two 6mm-thick blue foam sheets. (That's thicker than usual for foam sheets)
* 5mm-wide satin ribbon in different shades of green; the fact that they were bought in a specific set of colours implies to me that I had something in mind for them, but perhaps it was just a case of "ooh, pretty!"
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
(Yes, there were previous adventures.)

I've decided to stop using the term "knooking", and am going with a suggestion someone made in a forum on Ravelry, and start calling it "hook knitting". It's more precise, I think. Less confusing.

Why am I bothering with hook-knitting? Because I want to. Please don't call this craft a "rip off", "a waste of time", or "not real knitting". It is "real" knitting, it just uses different tools to achieve the same effect, just like loom-knitting does. Then again, loom-knitting also tends to be called "not real knitting". Enough - or I will end up derailing this post with a rant about Realness.

So... I've been doing more hook-knitting, trying out tools and methods and modifications.
Trial 1 )
Trial 2 )
Trial 3 )
Trial 4 )
Trial 5 )

further thoughts )
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
I tried doing some knooking yesterday, using a bamboo Tunisian crochet hook with an extension made of a plastic tube attached to the end of the hook (one of a set of them which I bought on E-Bay - like this). I was finding it quite difficult, and now I have figured out why. It was the plastic tube. It was too thick, and thus getting in the way.

See, an "official" Knook hook is a crochet hook with a hole drilled at the end, and a cord which you thread through the hole. This works because the cord is small enough not to get in the way. Likewise, there are extended Tunisian crochet hooks which work because the extension part is coated wire which is about 1mm thick, not a plastic tube which is 4mm thick.

So it isn't that I can't do knooking, it is that I was using the wrong tool for the job. Good to know (and now I need to get more appropriate hooks...)
kerravonsen: cartoon 8th Doctor: "perfect fit" (Doc8-perfect-fit)
I'm an organised thinker, and I'm thinking about organisation. These thoughts were prompted mainly by the process I have taken in organising my craft stuff, but the principles apply to other things as well. This isn't so much a series of tips or even necessarily a "how-to"; instead I'm being rather more analytical than this type of article usually is, not just saying "do this" but also the reasoning behind why it is a useful thing to do.

First Principle )
Second Principle )
Third Principle )
Putting This Into Action )
kerravonsen: chainmaille pendant, diamond-shaped, going from black to silver, from brown to gold (alchemy-friendship)
This is my entry in the current M.A.I.L. contest: "Steampunk". A maille-wrapped cane.

steampunk_cane-20151003-153257
Steampunk Cane by Kathryn Andersen. Large Anodized Aluminium (gold) washers tied on with leather thonging. Two wrapping chains spiralling around the shaft. Japanese 6 in 2: washer WD=2.0mm ID=3.0mm (Brass); large ring WD=1.0mm ID=4.76mm Anodized Aluminium (gold). Rosetta: WD=1.0mm ID=4.0mm (Anodized Aluminium, Steel) (gold)

steampunk_cane-2015-10-03
Steampunk Cane by Kathryn Andersen. Large Anodized Aluminium (gold) washers tied on with leather thonging. Two wrapping chains spiralling around the shaft. Japanese 6 in 2: washer WD=2.0mm ID=3.0mm (Brass); large ring WD=1.0mm ID=4.76mm Anodized Aluminium (gold). Rosetta: WD=1.0mm ID=4.0mm (Anodized Aluminium, Steel) (gold)

I am pleased I got it finished before the deadline, it was worrying me a bit.
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
And this post, is some craft tools I made, some old, some recent.
lucets )

peg loom )
kerravonsen: Crafty: a medly of beads (craft)
I bought this yarn on Friday, and I though I would kill two birds with one stone with it: I would make swatches of stitches I hadn't tried out before, and I would use those swatches as bases for scrumbles for my Amazing Housecoat (which doubtless will take years and years to finish).

And here are what I have done so far:

swatch-2015-09-27A
Swatch: HDC rib stitch; Patons Cosmos grey yarn, Acrylic/Wool/Lurex.

swatch-2015-09-27B
Swatch: Mesh stitch; Patons Cosmos grey yarn, Acrylic/Wool/Lurex.

swatch-2015-09-27C
Swatch: Griddle stitch and Crumpled Griddle stitch; Patons Cosmos grey yarn, Acrylic/Wool/Lurex.

swatch-2015-09-27D
Swatch: Staggered Diagonal Basketweave stitch; Patons Cosmos grey yarn, Acrylic/Wool/Lurex.

I have decided that I like this yarn a lot. Of course, it turns out that it's discontinued, which is why it was on sale... oh well I'll go back to Lincraft next week and see if they have any left (I only bought two balls).

Profile

kerravonsen: (Default)
Kathryn A.

February 2017

S M T W T F S
    123 4
56 78910 11
12131415161718
19202122 232425
262728    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Feb. 28th, 2017 05:43 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios